California Experiments With Fast-Tracking Medical School

First-year medical student Ngabo Nzigira gets ready to see a patient at the University of California, Davis in Sacramento.

First-year medical student Ngabo Nzigira gets ready to see a patient at the University of California, Davis in Sacramento.

Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio
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Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

Some doctors in the state of California will soon be able to practice after three years of medical school instead of the traditional four. The American Medical Association is providing seed money for the effort in the form of a $1 million, five-year grant to the University of California at Davis.

Student Ngabo Nzigira is in his sixth week of medical school and he’s already interacting with patients during training with a doctor at Kaiser Permanente in Sacramento.

In a traditional med school, Nzigira wouldn’t be in a clinic until his third year. In this accelerated course, students can shave up to $60,000 off the cost of their medical education. But Nzigira had hesitations.

A doctor writes in a file.

“I thought, ‘Oh man, you want me to put the intensity and stress that is medical school in four years, you want me to condense it down to three years. I’m not sure about

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/08/07/337729491/california-experiments-with-fast-tracking-medical-school?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=affordablecareact

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